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Hollandaise Sauce

hollandaise sauce Condiment
Hollandaise Sauce
  • Prep 10 min
  • Total 15 min
  • Servings 12

One of the “mother” sauces in classic French cuisine, this fundamental is perhaps best known in the United States as a decadent topping to eggs benedict. While this is indeed a wonderful way to use hollandaise, this creamy, rich, lemon-tinged sauce has so many other uses! And because hollandaise sauce is so easy to make—containing only butter, eggs and lemon—it’s worth committing to memory. MORE+ LESS-

Updated July 1, 2019

Ingredients

3
large egg yolks
1
tablespoon lemon juice
1/2
cup firm butter

Steps

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  • 1
    In 1 1/2-quart saucepan, vigorously stir egg yolks and lemon juice with wire whisk. Add 1/4 cup of the butter. Heat over very low heat, stirring constantly with wire whisk, until butter is melted.
  • 2
    Add remaining 1/4 cup butter. Continue stirring vigorously until butter is melted and sauce is thickened. (Be sure butter melts slowly so eggs have time to cook and thicken sauce without curdling.) If the sauce curdles (mixture begins to separate), add about 1 tablespoon boiling water and beat vigorously with wire whisk or hand beater until it's smooth.
  • 3
    Serve immediately. Store covered in refrigerator. To serve refrigerated sauce, reheat over very low heat and stir in a small amount of water.

Expert Tips

  • Some of our favorite ways to use this easy hollandaise sauce include, topping steamed vegetables, fish and of course, eggs—as in eggs benedict.
  • As mentioned above, hollandaise is considered one of the mother sauces in French cuisine. Other sauces in this group, include: béchamel (milk and roux, which is made of flour and butter), Espagnole (brown stock and a browned roux) and velouté (white stock thickened by roux). All of these sauces can take any number of forms but it’s helpful to know the basic formula for each of these. Most likely you’re already familiar with these sauces, in one form or another. For example, the gravy you make on Thanksgiving is a form of velouté and the sauce you make for homemade macaroni and cheese will start with a béchamel. So next time you run across these terms, there’s no need to be intimidated by the French words; chances are, you’re already very well acquainted with these fundamental sauces.
  • To make Béarnaise sauce, stir in 1 tablespoon dry white wine with the lemon juice. After sauce thickens, stir in 1 tablespoon finely chopped onion, 1 1/2 teaspoons chopped fresh or 1/2 teaspoon dried tarragon leaves and 1 1/2 teaspoons chopped fresh or 1/4 teaspoon dried chervil leaves. Serve with fish and meat.

Nutrition Information

Nutrition Facts

Serving Size: 1 Tablespoon
Calories
80
Calories from Fat
80
% Daily Value
Total Fat
9g
14%
Saturated Fat
4 1/2g
21%
Trans Fat
0g
Cholesterol
75mg
25%
Sodium
55mg
2%
Potassium
5mg
0%
Total Carbohydrate
0g
0%
Dietary Fiber
0g
0%
Sugars
0g
Protein
0g
% Daily Value*:
Vitamin A
8%
8%
Vitamin C
0%
0%
Calcium
0%
0%
Iron
0%
0%
Exchanges:
0 Starch; 0 Fruit; 0 Other Carbohydrate; 0 Skim Milk; 0 Low-Fat Milk; 0 Milk; 0 Vegetable; 0 Very Lean Meat; 0 Lean Meat; 0 High-Fat Meat; 2 Fat;
Carbohydrate Choice
0
*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.

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